Skip to main content

Construction issues resolution in Sydney - Part 12


As per last DFT inspection with the builder on 30/07 (1.5 months ago) the rectification order came out to rectify all defects by 07/09. The builder sent out a communication that they will come for three days 22/09-24/09 to do rectification.

So for waterproofing from the outside and floorboards damage the builder did re-seal in a couple of spots and then sprinkle the water to make impression they are testing something - without actual floor removal to see exactly whether the water is coming in or not.

For the bathroom leakage problems the builder said they have to demolish the bathroom to find a root cause. This issue was ordered by the tribunal to be rectified before 18/04/2014! Now 6 months of constant delays and trying to slow down the process by suggesting small steps to test the water leakage and at least two weeks of waiting between those steps the builder "decided" to demolish the bathroom. That still means the issue is not fixed despite the tribunal order.

Hoping it's going to finish before Christmas. Otherwise will be stuck well until end of January at least.

I am also looking forward to see the end of it at all at some stage. It's not funny at all, but the builders we were "lucky" to stick with are jokes.

I only see a couple of reasons why these people managed to stay in the industry for quite a long time (director of the building company says he is "40 years in business" every time he comes to inspect the defects):

a) majority of people just let go with the problems and fix it either at their own expense or using insurance;

b) Fair Trading involvement does not impose any penalty on the builder (at least in our case) and then consecutive tribunal cases require some time and follow-up from the property owner's;

c) majority of construction firms are similar in using cheap materials, labour and not implementing quality control - ridiculously high prices for property in Australia will surely make them good money and provide demand for property especially from foreign investors and they take advantage of the situation; instead of increasing quality or work and improving customer experience they just cut corners as much as possible and then just use any trick possible to refuse or delay the rectification process.

Stay tuned for further updates!

Other posts from this story.

Also have a look at my post regarding strata living and what to look at before and when you buy a strata unit.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Energy Business Case - Coal Mine in West Virginia

Situation Coal in Africa: An opportunity is available to invest in a coal mine in West Virginia. The mine’s value is less than in past years because of actual and anticipated restrictions on coal-fired power generation in the United States. However, the mine has a chance to sell its coal on contract to a public utility in West Africa. The utility is working through the World Bank for financing to build a number of coal-fired power plants. If they obtain World Bank financing, then a customer for the coal mine is assured, at least for the duration of the contracts. The power plants will employ the best current technology for burning coal, which exceeds all current air quality standards for the region. However, the power plants will not be designed to attempt carbon capture. The area of Africa the plants will serve suffers from extreme energy poverty, with some of the lowest per capita energy consumption in the world.

Overview of the Region West Africa is the westernmost region …

Wine - Castello del Poggio Moscato Provincia di Pavia

Awesome wine. Sweet with notes of pear, caramel, apricot.


Some details

Mastering The Multitasking

There is usually two distinct perspectives on multi-tasking:

1. Multitasking is counterproductive. We get distracted by multiple tasks that all get our way and fight for our scarce attention, time and resources. This leads to a common fallacy that if you do multiple activities “at a time” you are not doing good work in any of those.

2. Multitasking is a way of getting many things done in a short period of time or in a long run.

Indeed it can be either a disaster or a great helper depending on how it is used and practiced.

Most recent research shows that we don’t do multiple tasks purely in parallel or simultaneously. That means we don’t purely multi-task, but switch between tasks and execute them one at a time, but by spending very small timeframes on each task.

A good example from the history is a story about Julius Caesar capabilities in that area. Plutarch writes, “Caesar disciplined himself so far as to be able to dictate letters from on horseback, and to give directions to two w…